Stearman PT-17A Kaydett 1/24 Scale Mahogany Model

$ 155.95

Introducing the ready-built APT17T Desktop Model. This 1/24 scale model was handmade with precision and accuracy to produce the finest model that will be the centerpiece of your collection for years to come. This model is a perfect gift for pilots and aviation enthusiasts alike. Not too big or too small, this model features a wingspan of 17.25 inches and a length of 12.25 inches. This model features a very accurate paint scheme with realistic panel lines.

The collectible model PT-17 Kaydett represents one of the most popular biplanes ever built. Used to train thousands of pilots during World War II, the Kaydett is the export version of the venerable PT-17 Stearman. Painstakingly built from Philippine mahogany by our skilled craftsmen with a wealth of detail, this 1/24 scale model PT-17 Kaydett makes a great gift for any aviation enthusiast or history buff.

The collectable model PT-17 Stearman represents one of the most popular biplanes ever built. Used to train thousands of pilots during World War II, the Stearman became a common civilian crop-duster and recreation plane. Painstakingly built from Philippine mahogany by our skilled craftsmen with a wealth of detail, this 1/22 scale model PT-17 Stearman makes a great gift for any aviation enthusiast or history buff.

The PT-17 Stearman dates back to the 1930s, when the Stearman Company developed its X-70 prototype. The X-70 would go on to form the basis of the PT-13, PT-15, PT-18 and PT-27 trainers. Boeing, which bought the Stearman Company in 1934, would go on to produce almost 10,000 examples of this rugged aircraft.

As the PT-17, the Stearman – known as the Kaydet – in export versions – was powered by a Continental R-670 engine of 220 horsepower. An open cockpit biplane, the Stearman had a top speed of 124 mph and a range of 505 miles.

The navy version, the N2S, became known as the “Yellow Peril” because of its overall bright yellow paint. Navy versions included the N2S-2, with the R-680 engine, and the most comman Navy variant, the N2S-3 and N2S-4, with the R-670 engine.

After the war, thousands of Stearman biplanes were sold as surplus, and Stearmans became the most common postwar crop dusters. Hundreds of Stearmans still fly today.

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